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Cybercriminals – Cowardly Thugs Hiding Behind Computer Screens

Some criminals attempt to “justify” their thieving propensities by suggesting they don’t take large valued merchandise, or they do it to “test” another’s computer hacking forensic investigator. The inference of course is that they are somehow harmless. Criminals typically seek to ruse their law enforcement detractors, or any other person who questions what they do. They rationalize their thefts are non-violent and confined to smaller amounts of dollar losses, for which the items are easily replaced. Their matter-of-fact justifications don’t justify the unlawful taking of someone else’s personal or business property. They’re still criminals none the less and a breach of security means a contravention of the criminal laws.

For the net hoodlum operating in cyber space, their thinking plays an interesting con game, which they later rationalize and excuse as some “noble cause”. Bottom-line though, they’re criminals like their non-virtual counterparts. When caught, they invent all kinds of excuses and whine about their “victimization”. One wonders, when they sit there all day in front of their computers, what part of their anatomy are they really playing with most of the time? Some of these thieves try to scheme us with creative criminality, like “ransomware”, email schemes, credit card scams and other intrusive losses. The list of types of attacks is endless, as is the maliciousness behind the various illicit efforts for unmerited personal gain. Criminals no matter where they operate do so in a self-indulgent passion to misuse and abuse others for private purposes.

As always, one of our critical concerns is the injury, the loss and damages, caused to others as a result of internet criminality. Make no mistake, criminals choose to commit crimes of their own free will for the sake of getting something they didn’t earn or deserve. Make no mistake criminals dislike the responsible nature in others. Electronic breaches of the law are not unlike similar malevolent premeditated street-level crimes, in terms the psycho-dynamics. Some cyber criminals pose a danger to our banks accounts, while others risk the collapse of our economic system. And still others endanger our national security. In the amative stimulation for power and control, criminals will use any means. Like bank robbers or assailants on the street, cyber villains should receive the same levels of punishment. And, their conviction and subsequent sentencing should be sure, swift and certain and for long periods of time.

Criminals freely choose their particular criminogenic instigations. Of which, Cyber-crime involves billions of dollar losses every year to a global community. According to one source, the Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3), under the auspices of the FBI, in 2007, the agency received nearly a quarter million complaints regarding internet crimes. This likely has increased to more significant levels of late, and represents the tip of the proverbial cyber-criminal iceberg. No doubt a wealth of information flowing through the internet signifies targets of opportunities for criminals.

Naturally, what we often forget is that there is a difference between reported criminality and actual criminality, or otherwise known as the “dark figure of crime”. There’s a sizeable portion of criminal activity that goes unreported and therefore not investigated. Investigatively, law enforcement endeavors to respond efficiently as possible, given the resources available. And yet, the nature of virtual crime is complex, with such diverse challenges, as email and texting scams, business and banking intrusions, to commercial fraud, money laundering and market manipulations.

 

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